LSTC scholars among speakers, leaders at American Academy of Religion, Society of Biblical Literature meetings November 19, 2018

With 16 presenters on the schedule, the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago is well-represented at the American Academy of Religion and the Society of Biblical Literature annual meetings currently held in Denver, Colorado.

The annual conference featuring theological and biblical scholars began Thursday and ends Tuesday. The event, also attended by LSTC community members, both faculty and students, includes more than 1,200 events: academic sessions, receptions, tours and workshops.

LSTC is represented by faculty Ralph Klein (emeritus), Barbara Rossing, Lea Schweitz, Mark Swanson and Marvin Wickware; auxiliary faculty Thomas R. Blanton, Andrew Guffey, Matthew Mellott; students Ki-Min Bang, PhD; Iskandar Bcheiry, PhD; Yoseob Song, PhD; graduates: Joel Cruz, PhD 2009; Gilbert Okuro Ojwang, PhD 2007; Ahida Pilarski, PhD 2008; Caryn Riswold, PhD 2000; and staff May May Latt, PhD 2012.  

Participation includes presiding over panels, serving as panelists or respondents, and presenting their research. Those from LSTC who are presenting:

Ki-Min Bang: “The Biblical Conflict Myth and Ecological Hermeneutics” for the SBL Bible, Myth, and Myth Theory Section.

Iskandar Bcheiry:Qur’anic Leaves in Kufic Script on Vellum from the Ninth or Tenth Centuries in the Monastery of Saint Lazarus, Venice”for The Qur’an: Manuscripts and Textual Criticism (IQSA) Theme: Manuscripts and Commentaries.

Thomas R. Blanton, IV: “The Self-Support and Sustenance of Paul the skēnopoios” for the SBL The Historical Paul Consultation; Theme: Paul and Sustenance.

Joel Cruz: “¡Mira, pa ya en el cielo!” for the Postcolonial Theology and Theological Aesthetics in Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez’s La Borinqueña Religions in the Latina/o Americas Unit; Theme: Theologies of Connection and Identity across the Latino/ a/x Americas.

Gilbert Okuro Ojwang: Deuteronomy 17:14-20 and the (Il)legitimacy of African Rulers”for African Biblical Hermeneutics; Theme: Biblical Responses to "Strong Men" Syndrome in Africa.

Andrew Guffey: Toxic Femininity? Enkrateia and Gender in Christian Apocryphal Literature” for Christian Apocrypha; Theme: Sex and Violence in the Christian Apocrypha.

Matthew Mellott: “Resistance in the Way of the Cross: A Study of the Resistant Nature of Matthew 10:38” for the SBL Social Scientific Criticism of the New Testament Section.

Caryn Riswold: “Already Freed,Christians Should Serve (Cake): Christian Privilege & Religious Freedom Claims” in the Martin Luther and Global Lutheran and Global Lutheran Traditions Unit  Theme: Contexts for Identity and Freedom: Challenges for Luther and Lutheranism.

Barbara Rossing: “Woe, Horror, Disaster, or Lament? Revisiting Translations of ouai in Revelation” for the SBL Ecological Hermeneutics Section; Theme: Bible Translation: Grey or Green: The ecological overtones of translation choices.

Lea Schweitz: “A Hermeneutical Phenomenology of Urban Ecology: for the
Theology and Religious Reflection Unit; Theme: Religion as Environmentalism? Conceptual, Topological, and Phenomenological Interventions.

Yoseob Song: “Sinai Arabic MS 151 and Its Apologetic-Polemic Characteristics” for the Traditions of Eastern Late Antiquity Unit; Theme: Polemic in Eastern Late Antiquity.
 
Marvin Wickware: “Black Reality as Subversive Fantasy: White Supremacy and Black Brilliance in Get Out and Black Panther” for the Religion, Film, and Visual Culture Unit; Theme: Subversive Filmmaking and Race.

Contact

Cheryl Hoth
Assistant to the Dean of Academic Affairs
773.256.0721
choth@lstc.edu

Jan Boden
Director of Communication and Marketing
773.256.0744
janet.boden@lstc.edu

The Lutheran School of Theology (LSTC) is dedicated to bearing witness to the good news of Jesus Christ. Based in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood, it is the leading urban Lutheran seminary training students for purposeful vocations in the global community. Aligned with its Lutheran heritage and built on a foundation of intellectual rigor, LSTC’s innovative, nationally recognized curriculum gives students skills for visionary Christian leadership in the public sphere.

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